Thought Starters

The following is a collection of articles and thought pieces highlighting interesting trends and changes in the world you and I live in.

Benedict Evans looks at which organisations can really benefit from a mobile app based digital strategy:

Do you have the kind of relationship, and proposition, that people will want to engage with  enough to put your icon on their phone? If the answer to this is ‘yes’, then you should have an app – if only because the app store is the way to do that that people understand, and they’ll look for you in the app store.

Nielsen figures point to 30 being the ceiling for the number of mobile apps typically used by consumers:

Mobile Apps

GlobalWebIndex figures point to Pinterest and Tumblr’s rapid growth globally, albeit off a much smaller base than the likes of Facebook:

Pinterest and Tumblr

Providing a more flattering view for Facebook are figures from the UK published by Ofcom in its Adults’ media use and attitudes Report 2015. The report also has plenty of coverage of UK consumer’s use of other media and devices:

Social media sites

There has been a lot of coverage in the media press on Facebook’s launch of Instant Articles. The service sees consumers access content on Facebook’s servers rather than being directed onto the publishers own platforms. This represents a further strengthening of Facebook’s position, but as Vox points out, has a certain inevitability to it.

Eugene Wei contrasts minimalist and frictionless design, suggesting that we should typically be aiming for the latter:

Minimalist design is about reducing the surface area of an experience. Frictionless design is about reducing the energy required by an experience.

Evolutionary biologist Josh Roseneau has looked at the correlations between faith groups in the USA and their attitudes towards evolution and environmental regulations:

Climate vs Religion

The Longform Podcast has been a recent discovery, with journalists interviewed about the story behind the story. A recent episode profiles  reporter Sarah Maslin Nir coverage of the New York nail salon industry and the brazen exploitation of its workforce. You can find Nir’s story over on the New York Times.

Well renowned journalist Seymour Hersh wrote a valuable article in the London Review of Books pointing out major inconsistencies in the United States’ account of the killing of Osama bin Laden. Unfortunately some commentators have chosen to attack the journalist rather than the story as Trevor Timm details in an account for the Columbia Journalism Review.

In an interesting interplay of film and gentrification, Nick Carr provides an account of life as a location scout in New York trying to find a quintessential New York which increasingly doesn’t exist.

Chip Rowe looks at the different design flaws in the human body and suggests some hacks to rectify them:

Evolution constructed our bodies with the biological equivalent of duct tape and lumber scraps. And the only way to refine the form (short of an asteroid strike or nuclear detonation to wipe clean the slate) is to jerry-rig the current model. “Evolution doesn’t produce perfection,” explains Alan Mann, a physical anthropologist at Princeton University. “It produces function.”

The featured image is Vegan To’ona’i by Askew One in Auckland, New Zealand and the photo was published in StreetArtNews.

Messages that resonate

This is part of an irregular series of blog posts looking at marketing communications which have caught my attention. This will complement Thought Starters which will look more at trends, strategies and ideas.

Bose’s Scene Unseen series of short documentaries shines a light on musical scenes in unexpected corners. A great use of branded content to tell engaging stories to relevant audiences.

Chrome Experiment’s has launched a couple of eye catching experiments. The first follows the ISEE-3 space exploration satellite. You don’t need to be a fan of space travel to appreciate the site’s visuals using WebGL.

The second Chome Experiment piece provides a visual companion to music from John Cale in collaboration with architect Liam Young and Field.io in an interactive music video. The YouTube link below should give you a taste of what to expect but you’re best to experience the site directly.

Google’s Cultural Institute has created a website bringing together street art from around the world. As you’d expect from Google, content is accessible by location and artist drawing on a mixture of photos and videos from collections from around the world.

Street Art Project

Heineken has created a new tool using Twitter that aims to provide consumers with recommendations for restaurants, cafés and bars based on their location drawing on social media activity including tweets, check-ins and photos across Twitter, Instagram and Foursquare. Consumers simply tweet @wherenext and their location to Twitter and it will get back to you with a response. More information over at The Drum.

WhereNext

Orangina have launched a new responsive website providing users with a friendly and uncluttered user experience.  Simple but effective.Orangina

Anad Sharma provides his own take on the quantified self tracking his own activities through data visualisations and well designed website.

April Zero

More interesting data visualisations, this time looking at life in the day of a New York taxi cab. A case of statistics and data brought to life.

NYC Taxis

The Universal Typeface Experiment looks to compare people’s handwriting from around the world. Using user submitted handwriting, the site provides viewers with the ability to filter by gender, age, country handednesss and industry. A nice way of celebrating handwriting from Bic as we spend more and more time at a keyboard.

Bic

Water resistant paint makes good use of one of Seattle’s more well known traits to promote the Bumbershoot arts and music festival.

The featured image is a piece by Mikołaj Rejs in Lublin, Poland and found on ekosystem.